Home / Author Archives: Stefano Salimbeni (page 2)

Author Archives: Stefano Salimbeni

Stefano is a Boston-based freelance reporter, correspondent and producer for Italy’s national TV network RAI. Over the past 15 years he has produced more than 800 “Italian-angled” news stories and features from New England and from around the United States for RAI’s international channel, RAI Italia, broadcast to over 60 million viewers of Italian origins or of Italian descent living outside of Italy. He also assisted, and occasionally still does, RAI’s main correspondents in producing news stories and special reports during major news events. For the past three years, Stefano has also been the US correspondent for Famiglia Cristiana, one of Italy’s most widely circulated national magazines. He came to Boston in 1996 to earn a master’s degree and fulfill a lifelong dream of being a journalist. Stefano’s work can be viewed on his personal website, www.stefanosalimbeni.com.

The Magic Culinary Touch of Chef Marisa Iocco


“Cooking is an act of love — an ancient primal gesture,” Executive Chef Marissa Iocco opines. “Like all acts of love, it is deeply gratifying and like all ancient primal gestures, it’s good for the soul.” Executive Chef Marisa Iocco is a cook at heart as well as by vocation, but she doesn’t look the part. Slender, tall, sporty and tanned to perfection, as she sits in the sun on a glorious morning at one of the wooden tables in Old North Square, she could pass for a cyclist on a break. She is, in fact, taking a break — ...

Read More »

St. Leonard’s Pastor Padre Antonio Nardoianni


St. Leonard is wrapped in scaffolding to the point of not looking much like a church anymore. Even the sounds (including some of the language used by the workers) are not very church-like. As I wait for Padre Antonio Nardoianni, pastor of what is basically the only fully functional church left in Boston’s historical Italian neighborhood, I find myself thinking, “Maybe they should put extra signs — not for the locals, of course — but certainly for the tourists.” In fact, my refection wasn’t totally off mark. The fact that the Rubenesque Franciscan friar, who has led this parish for ...

Read More »

Cumar’s Ivo Cubi: A destiny carved in marble


Editor’s Note: In our magazine teaser item for this profile, we had Mr. Cubi actually roaming the hills of South America in search of precious metals as a young adult, rather than simply dreaming of it. His life has been adventurous enough without that erroneous excursion, and we apologize to the interviewee and author alike for the inaccuracy. No matter how hard he tried, Ivo Cubi could not have done anything else for a living. His last name, to begin with, in Italian literally means “Cubes.” Plus he was born into a family that, in one capacity or another, has ...

Read More »

Professor Flavia Laviosa: Making Italian useful


Most of her life has been spent in front of an open book, first in college while studying foreign languages and literatures; then during her travels around Europe; then in Buffalo, N.Y.; and finally during a quarter century as an educator.

Read More »

Mario Motta’s passion is “written in the stars”

Mario Motta

Apparently, Mario Motta has a successful medical career: Not only is he an established practicing cardiologist but he has also been the president of the Massachusetts Medical Association for many years. Yet he does not talk about it much. Actually, asking him about his job can be a somewhat frustrating Q&A, where the A is usually a brief, telegraphic sentence. The same can be said for questions about his family — although his three grown kids also have successful careers of their own — or any other “earthly” subject, for that matter. But when the conversation turns up — meaning ...

Read More »

Silk scientist Fiorenzo Omenetto


Fiorenzo Omenetto works with silk all day (and apparently a lot of nights, too), but he does not make clothes, not even invisible ones, contrary to rumors triggered by a journalistic exaggeration published a couple of years ago and quickly spread around the world. Yet, thanks to a fascination with this natural material — discovered at the dawn of civilization and used by mankind ever since — the scruffily bearded 46-year-old scientist from Varese, Italy, makes just about everything else. In his hands — or, to be exacted, by the state-of-the-art tools and machinery at Tufts University’s brand new 20-scentist-strong ...

Read More »

Francesca Gino’s “right choices”

Francesca Gino

Growing up in her native Tione, a small Alpine town in the Italian province of Trento, Francesca Gino dreamed of becoming an engineer. The idea of building houses fascinated her, and she wanted to do it for a living. “But my then-boyfriend was already enrolled in a college engineering course and according to his mother, having two engineers in the same family was not such a good idea, so I signed up for economics,” recalls the bright-eyed, 35-year-old, full-time Harvard Business School professor, slightly embarrassed in telling such a personal tale. “I was ‘sidetracked,'” she concludes. And that’s when I ...

Read More »

Tutto Italiano owner Angelo Locilento


“If you love what you do, you don’t work a day in your life,” says Angelo Locilento as he somewhat reluctantly leaves his post at the counter of Tutto Italiano, where long lines of customers from all races, ages and walks of life wait to be served either some special product directly imported from Italy or some freshly made in-store treat. “Look! This is a fully functioning bakery that just finished making bread for the day,” he points out as we pass through the yeast-and-flour scented facility to his office. After a careful look I see what he means. The ...

Read More »

Giuseppe Argentieri: The Ambassador of Italian cheese


“I don’t like it when they call me the king of mozzarella. That title is loaded with pressure and responsibility,” Giuseppe Argentieri says with a smile as he supervises the production of the day’s batch of fresh burrata before shipping it to specialty stores all over the Boston area. Then, after swallowing a chunk of the white, chewy, still-warm product of a morning’s work and giving the nod to the cheese maker — who puts these balls of goodness together by hand — he suddenly becomes serious. “All I’d like to be considered is the one who makes the best ...

Read More »

Federica Del Monte: A doctor with research ‘at heart’

Dr. Federica del Monte

Who would have figured that Alzheimer’s disease and cardiomyopathy might be siblings, and that new therapies for both might be found simultaneously? In fact, nobody knows for sure, but Dr. Federica Del Monte, assistant professor at Harvard Medical School thinks so. Otherwise, she wouldn’t have spent most of her waking life for the past 15 years in the relentless pursuit of a non-surgical cure for dilated cardiomyopathy, a progressive heart disease that unnaturally enlarges the body’s main muscle, eventually causing it to fail. In some cases, the culprits is the plaque that builds up around the heart, often reaching critical ...

Read More »

Henry Zunino: Sculptor at Heart, Candyman by Profession

Henry Zunino holds up one of his prized chocolate tablets.

Imagine a lobster on a stick: not a real one, but rather a small crustacean-shaped lollipop to take home as a souvenir of a trip to Boston, or — why not — after a real Lobster dinner with your kids. The lobster-shaped treat is not mass produced in China for some giant corporation, but rather crafted and created by local sculptor Henry Zunino, a self-made entrepreneur in his self-made artisanal laboratory in Everett, Massachusetts, where his company Strawberry Hill Candy started in 2009. The company’s flagship product, the Lobster (individual claws are also available), is really only one of many ...

Read More »

Italian language activist Gioconda Motta


“When we lived in Melrose in the mid 1970s, my eldest daughter used to bring pizza to school for lunch. For her, having grown up in an Italian household, it was the most normal thing in the world. At some point however she started to come home and say they were making fun of her, therefore she didn’t want pizza anymore. Yes, discrimination was that strong! That is when I went to the principal and I said I want to start an afternoon enrichment program — in Italian. After a couple of years, we had 30 children and families were ...

Read More »